Up on the 7th Floor on an Evening in ’85

it-came-from-the-SB-bannerphong-detOne evening back in April of 1985 rather than do work that was due for one of our classes at the Philadelphia College of Art a group of guys up on the Illustration Floor decided to procrastinate by doing some real art. That entailed grabbing somebody who didn’t feel like drawing; having that person pose in a somewhat comfortable position and drawing either he or she.

Me? I decided to hunt the hunters by drawing the drawers.

Tim Brown was the model that evening.

tim-brownNote Roger Thompson in the background who had transferred to illustration from another department and was probably working on his senior project which was known as The (fearsome) Ely.

Ted Whitehead looks angry, but he wasn’t. Just focused. And he was pumped.

ted-whiteheadPhong had joined the party as well.

phongOriginally I was rooting through my sketchbooks looking for a drawing I half-remember drawing and came upon these little throw-away sketches. I often wish I had taken more photographs back then, but these scribbles will have to suffice as a window on another place and time.

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5 Responses to Up on the 7th Floor on an Evening in ’85

  1. Old NFO says:

    Nice quickies… 🙂

  2. John says:

    Joe: You say “I wish I had taken more photos in 1985”. I have that thought often remembering college days. You have to remember that we did not have digital cameras. The first digital cameras were also very expensive. Now I will take 300 shots at a event and still delete 200 or so. There is not a worry about the cost of paper, film, etc. etc. Digital photos will do wonders to document a time and place in history.

  3. John says:

    Joe: Where did Phog get the swagger he is working in your sketch?

  4. Joe_Williams says:

    Agreed about digital photos. They are great, and you can actually explore photography rather than being hobbled with the expense of processing. Make sure you back them up or burn them to archival media so the kids and grandkids can enjoy them.

    I still wish I had more shots. An Instamatic or any thing. I think that because we went to art school, we got to caught up in the artiness of it. Composition, exposure, etc. Instead we should have snapped off crappy snapshots just to document people and places.

    Phong would work huge and very intensely and he would lean back to take it in.

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